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Ambush Rules

The regular Stargrunt II turn sequence makes it very difficult to conduct a proper ambush. These house rules can be used as scenario specific rules in order to run an ambush scenario.

Simple Ambush

The easiest way to set up an ambush is to make the ambush a complete surprise to the side being ambushed. This isn't very realistic, but it works particularly well in demonstration games or for fast scenarios.

First, the player that will be ambushed writes down the order that his units will move on the table, and the distance separating them.

Next, the player conducting the ambush places his figures on the tabletop, or places hidden unit counters and dummy counters on the tabletop. Typically, the ambusher has restrictions on where on the table he can set up.

Then, the player being ambushed shows the other player the order in which his units will move, and the distance separating them.

Finally, the player conducting the ambush indicates where he wants the lead unit to be when the ambush is sprung. The ambushed player places his first unit on the table at the indicated location, then he places all of the other units in the column on the table at the correct distance separating them.

The ambush scenario now begins, with the ambushing player being allowed to activate his units first (even if he has more units on the table than the ambushed player).

Complex Ambush

Ambushes rarely work flawlessly. Ambushes have been triggered prematurely, or the hidden units have been discovered early. If you want these possibilities in your ambush scenario, conduct a complex ambush.

First, the player that will be ambushed writes down the order that his units will move on the table, and the distance separating them.

Next, the player conducting the ambush places his figures on the tabletop, or places hidden unit counters and dummy counters on the tabletop. Typically, the ambusher has restrictions on where on the table he can set up. Complex Ambushes, though, usually have less constraints on where the ambusher may set up due to the possibility of the ambush being sprung prematurely.

Then, the player being ambushed shows the other player the order in which his units will move, and the distance separating them.

A route for the ambushed player's convoy/column is determined ahead of time, either as part of the scenario specific rules, or by allowing the ambushed player to plot a course across the table. The first unit in the ambushed player's convoy/column is moved onto the edge of the table.

Each turn, the ambushing player makes a Reaction Test for all of his units. The test is at Threat Level -1. This means that the test is not made by units with a Leadership value of 1. If none of the ambushing units fail the test, the lead unit in column is moved it's full movement, and the rest of the column's units are placed on the table behind it, at the indicated separation distance.

If one or more ambushing units do fail the Reaction Test, they have attacked the convoy/column prematurely. Roll the movement die type for the lead unit in the column. This is the number of inches the lead unit moves before the ambush is sprung prematurely. The rest of the units in the column/convoy are placed on the table behind it, at the indicated separation distance. The game now begins with the ambushing player activating first, even if that player has more units on the table.

If no units sprung the ambush prematurely that turn, the ambushed player now gets to make spotting attempts for his units to see if they can spot the ambushers. Each unit in the column can make one spotting attempt. The scenario may indicate whether or not a unit within a vehicle can spot (for instance, an infantry unit packed into the back of an APC may not have access to windows in the APC and may not be able to see out of the vehicle).

If a spotting attempt is successful, the game begins with the column at their current position. The ambushed player (the player who's units succeeded in making a spotting attempt) activate first, even if that player has more units on the table.

This process of making reaction tests, moving the lead unit, and then making spotting tests occurs until ambusher is ready to spring the ambush. The ambusher determines where the ambush will take place. The ambusher must still make Reaction Tests for his units. If any fail, the lead unit is still moved a random number of inches forward on the table. If this takes the unit past the point where the ambusher wants to spring the ambush, too bad. If no reaction test was failed, the lead unit is moved either its full movement distance, or to the point where the ambusher wants the unit. This point must be on the unit's movement path, and the lead unit must move less than or equal to its full movement distance.

The game now begins with the ambushing player activating first, even if that player has more units on the table. The ambusher does not get one last attempt to try and spot the ambushers.

Options

The scenario may or may not allow "spotting by fire". This should be spelled out in the scenario. There should be a good reason to allow a unit to fire blindly in the hope of hitting a hidden unit. If a unit, for instance, is travelling through an area that they know has a high probability of hiding an ambush, "spotting by fire" should be allowed.